Client Benefits and Funding care 

Detailed information on the benefits listed and/or the application forms for the benefits can be found on the links provided below the information provided. There are many benefits that can support your loved one or support you with a loved one, we have all heard about Housing and council tax which helps, however, there are many others – below are just a few.

You could get £67.60 a week if you care for someone at
least 35 hours a week. You do not have to be related to, or live with, the
person you care for. Carers Allowance - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

Attendance Allowance helps with extra costs if you
have a disability severe enough that you need someone to help look after you.
You could get £60 or £89.60 a week to help with personal support if you’re
both:
 physically or mentally disabled
 State Pension age or older
It does not cover mobility needs. The other benefits you get can increase if you
get Attendance Allowance.
Attendance Allowance - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

Personal Independence Payment (PIP) can help with extra living costs if you have both:

  • a long-term physical or mental health condition or disability

  • difficulty doing certain everyday tasks or getting around because of your condition

You can get PIP even if you’re working, have savings or are getting most other benefits. There are 2 parts to PIP:

  • a daily living part - if you need help with everyday tasks

  • a mobility part - if you need help with getting around

Personal Independence Payment (PIP) - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

If you’re caring for someone for at least 20 hours a week.

Carer's Allowance - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

currently being replaced by PIP – you can only apply for DLA if you or the person needing support is under 16 years of age.

Disability Living Allowance (DLA) for adults - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

is a payment to help with your living costs. It’s paid monthly and is currently replacing the following benefits:

 

  • Housing Benefit

  • Income Support

  • income-based Jobseeker’s Allowance (JSA)

  • income-related Employment and Support Allowance (ESA)

  • Working Tax Credit

  • Child Tax Credit

 

You might get an extra amount of Universal Credit if you have a health condition or disability that prevents you from working or preparing for work. If you’re terminally ill, you may get extra money for Universal Credit.

Universal Credit - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

If you get, or are entitled to, the severe disability premium you may be able to get ‘transitional protection’ if you move to Universal Credit.

This is an extra payment to help with your move to Universal Credit. Most people will get this automatically, but some will need to claim it

Disability premiums are extra amounts of money added to your:

  • Income Support

  • income-based Jobseeker’s Allowance (JSA)

  • income-related Employment and Support Allowance (ESA)

  • Housing Benefit

There are 3 types of disability premium for adults:

  • disability premium

  • enhanced disability premium

  • severe disability premium

You can get more than one premium at a time.

Personal Independence Payment (PIP) can help with extra living costs if you have both:

  • a long-term physical or mental health condition or disability

  • difficulty doing certain everyday tasks or getting around because of your condition

You can get PIP even if you’re working, have savings or are getting most other benefits. There are 2 parts to PIP:

  • a daily living part - if you need help with everyday tasks

  • a mobility part - if you need help with getting around

Personal Independence Payment (PIP) - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

You could get a grant from your council if you’re disabled and need to make changes to your home, for example to:

  • widen doors and install ramps

  • improve access to rooms and facilities - eg stairlifts or a downstairs bathroom

  • provide a heating system suitable for your needs

  • adapt heating or lighting controls to make them easier to use

 

You or someone living in your property must be disabled. Either you or the person you’re applying for must:

  • own the property or be a tenant

  • intend to live in the property during the grant period (which is currently 5 years)

You can also apply for a grant if you’re a landlord and have a disabled tenant. If you need to adapt your home because of a disability or old age, you can apply to the council for equipment or help.

The council needs to be happy that the work is:

  • necessary and appropriate to meet the disabled person’s needs

  • reasonable and can be done - depending on the age and condition of the property

Disabled Facilities Grants - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

If you or someone you care for, get help from social services, you can apply for direct payments. These let you choose (care worker) and buy the services (care) you need yourself, instead of getting them from your council.

Apply for direct payments - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

If you’re a homeowner, you might be able to get help towards interest payments on:

  • your mortgage

  • loans you’ve taken out for certain repairs and improvements to your home

This help is called Support for Mortgage Interest (SMI).

Support for Mortgage Interest (SMI) - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

You might be able to get free NHS prescriptions, dental treatment, eye tests and help with other NHS costs.

Whether you get help depends on things like:

  • your age

  • your income

  • where you live

  • if you get certain benefits

  • if you’re pregnant

  • if you have a medical condition

Get help with NHS prescriptions and health costs - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

You could get a grant from your council if you’re disabled and need to make changes to your home, for example to:

  • widen doors and install ramps

  • improve access to rooms and facilities - eg stairlifts or a downstairs bathroom

  • provide a heating system suitable for your needs

  • adapt heating or lighting controls to make them easier to use

 

You or someone living in your property must be disabled. Either you or the person you’re applying for must:

  • own the property or be a tenant

  • intend to live in the property during the grant period (which is currently 5 years)

You can also apply for a grant if you’re a landlord and have a disabled tenant. If you need to adapt your home because of a disability or old age, you can apply to the council for equipment or help.

The council needs to be happy that the work is:

  • necessary and appropriate to meet the disabled person’s needs

  • reasonable and can be done - depending on the age and condition of the property

Disabled Facilities Grants - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)